History


Temple Trouble!

Over the Christmas break, Scafell class were set the challenge of researching and building their very own Greek temple from recycled materials. Not being able to bring them into school, we put the call out for pictures to be sent in. The response has been phenomenal! The Scafell class email has been groaning with the (virtual) weight of dozens of meticulously hand-crafted temples, complete with detailed friezes, smart column designs and intricate brickwork. We’ve been absolutely blown away by the time and dedication that is clear to see here, and no two temples are the same! Not only do they look beautiful, but it is clear that real skill has gone into their construction. Taking inspiration from Greek temples from history, the use of columns, walls and pitched roofs gives them a sense of strength and sturdiness.

A huge thank you to everyone who sent a picure (or several!) in to us. We’ve tried to showcase each and every one, so have a look through the gallery and see if you can spot yours!


Skara Brae and Stonehenge

We are learning about the New Stone Age or Neolithic this week in history. Here we are creating models of amazingly in tact Stone Age constructions that we can still see today, perhaps nearly 5000 years after they were built!

Year 3 and 2 were learning about the world famous Skara Brae on the Orkney Islands. It was only discovered in 1850 and is a small village of 8 houses linked together with covered tunnels. You didn’t need to put your coat on to visit your neighbours here!

Year 4 researched Stonehenge, another very famous Neolithic construction made up of circles of stones which took hundreds of years to construct. Like us adding extensions to our houses, Neolithic people kept changing things at Stonehenge so it developed over a long time with new stones being added or the existing ones being moved.

We had a great time this morning, creating models with construction kits. The colours aren’t quite right of course but by using our imagination we made furniture and stones that Neolithic people might have recognised!

Here we are…

 


Stone Age Cave Painting

Skiddaw class are learning all about the Stone Age in history. We have begun by finding out how we know what types of animals were around in the Stone Age. Lascaux Caves were discovered by some teenagers and possibly their dog in September 1940. Paintings of bulls, oxen, horses and stags are beautifully clear and are thought to be around 15,000 years old. Drawn by Stone Age people, they also show us early humans hunting as well as animals that were around then. We took an amazing virtual tour around the many passages and caves that are now not open to public in order to preserve them.

This has inspired us to create our own cave and rock art. Here we are preparing our rock by scrunching and painting on the paper to make it look more realistic. We are also making paper mache rocks to experiment with drawing smaller creatures on. It was lovely to work outside on a sunny afternoon on Wednesday. Next week we’ll be trying our hand at drawing stone age animals on these papers with chalk pastels and paint.